Italy: Slain police officer didn’t have gun when attacked – Officer was stabbed 11 times with military-style knife

The coffin containing the body of the Carabinieri's officer Mario Cerciello Rega is carried during his funeral in his hometown of Somma Vesuviana, near Naples, southern Italy, Monday, July 29, 2019. Two American teenagers were jailed in Rome on Saturday as authorities investigate their alleged roles in the fatal stabbing of the Italian police officer on a street near their hotel. (Cesare Abbate/ANSA via AP)

By FRANCES D’EMILIO,  Associated Press  ROME (AP) 07/31 — A plainclothes police officer had forgotten his gun the night he was fatally stabbed during a confrontation with two American teenagers in Rome, an Italian police commander said Tuesday.

Gen. Francesco Gargaro of Italy’s paramilitary Carabinieri police force said that even if the officer had been armed, he would not have had time to draw his weapon before he was mortally wounded with a military-style knife.

During a news conference, the commander provided some of the first details about the encounter early Friday in which Deputy Brigadier Mario Cerciello Rega, 35, was knifed 11 times.

In this photo released by Carabinieri, is portrayed officer Mario Cerciello Rega, 35, who was stabbed to death in Rome early Friday, July 26, 2019. Italian police said Saturday that two 19-year-old American tourists have confessed to fatally stabbing the Italian paramilitary policeman who was investigating the theft of a bag with a cellphone.

 

This picture released by Italian Carabinieri during a press conference in Rome, Tuesday, July 30, 2019, shows the knife used to stab Carabinieri’s officer Mario Cerciello Rega early Friday. Two American teenagers were jailed in Rome on Saturday as authorities investigate their alleged roles in the fatal stabbing of the Italian police officer on a street near their hotel. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

 

Cerciello Riga and a partner, Andrea Varriale, were assigned to respond to an extortion attempt involving a failed drug deal, Gargaro said. Thieves had demanded money and cocaine in exchange for returning a stolen backpack, he said.

The officers were in plainclothes and identified themselves as Carabinieri as they approached two suspects, but were immediately attacked, Gargaro said.

Asked why Cerciello Rega didn’t pull his gun, Gargaro said the officer had “forgotten” his weapon after being asked to work on a scheduled day off.

“In any case, there was no time to use it,” Gargaro said.

Other officers were unaware Cerciello Rega didn’t have his gun with him when he set out on what would be a fatal assignment, police said.

“He is the only one who knows why he didn’t have it with him,” Gargaro said.

From left, Carabinieri Colonel Lorenzo D’Aloia, prosecutors Nunzia D’Elia, and Michele Pristipino, and Carabinieri General Francesco Gargaro arrive to a press conference about the investigation on the murder of Carabinieri’s officer Mario Cerciello Rega in Rome, Tuesday, July 30, 2019. Two American teenagers were jailed in Rome on Saturday as authorities investigate their alleged roles in the fatal stabbing of the Italian police officer on a street near their hotel. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

 

The two suspects from California, Finnegan Lee Elder, 19, and Gabriel Christian Natale-Hjorth, 18, were detained in the officer’s slaying hours later. Police have said Elder is suspected of being the one who stabbed Cerciello Rega while Natale-Hjorth is suspected of assaulting the other officer.

Varriale did have his gun, but after Natale-Hjorth stopped punching and scratching and ran off, the officer turned his attention to his wounded partner, Gargaro said.

The general also stressed that under Italian law it is illegal to fire at a fleeing suspect. If he had done so, Varriale “would have been under investigation for a grave crime.”

A judge who approved the jailing of the two suspects Saturday said there were “grave” indications the Americans were responsible for the Carabinieri officer’s death.

In this combo photo released by Italian Carabinieri, Gabriel Christian Natale Hjorth, right, and Finnegan Lee Elder, sit in their hotel room in Rome. Two American teenagers were jailed in Rome on Saturday as authorities carry out a murder investigation in the killing of Italian police officer Mario Cerciello Rega, 35. A detention order issued by prosecutors was shown on Italian state broadcaster RAI, naming the suspects as Gabriel Christian Natale Hjorth and Finnegan Lee Elder. (Italian Carabinieri via AP)

 

According to the judge’s written ruling, Elder and Natale-Hjorth allegedly paid a dealer for cocaine but didn’t get the drug before the approach of police officers interrupted the deal.

Investigators said the two then snatched and ran off with the knapsack of the Italian man who put them in contact with the dealer.

Police said when the intermediary, Sergio Brugiatelli, called the cellphone in the stolen backpack, the teens told him they would return the bag in exchange for 100 euros ($112) and a gram of cocaine.

Brugiatelli reported the demand to police and set up a meeting with the teens. It was Cerciello Rega and Varriale who went to the rendezvous point.

Varriale recounted later that they identified themselves as Carabinieri and showed their badges but were attacked right away, Judge Chiara Gallo wrote in her ruling upholding the detention. The teen suspects told investigators they did not know the two men who showed up to meet them were police officers, the judge said.

Carabinieri officer Mario Cerciello Rega’s wife, Rosa Maria, right, follows the coffin containing the body of her husband during his funeral in his hometown of Somma Vesuviana, near Naples, southern Italy, Monday, July 29, 2019. Two American teenagers were jailed in Rome on Saturday as authorities investigate their alleged roles in the fatal stabbing of the Italian police officer on a street near their hotel. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

 

During his interrogation, Elder told authorities he stabbed Cerciello Rega because he feared he was being strangled, the judge said while noting in her ruling the teen didn’t have any marks on his neck.

The two graduated from the same high school north of San Francisco in 2018. Both had just finished a first year at different community colleges in Southern California.

Elder has no criminal record but his uncle, Sean Elder, acknowledged his nephew was arrested as a juvenile.

Sean Elder told The Associated Press on Tuesday that his nephew took part in organized “fight nights” at a popular San Francisco park where high school boys brawled. Elder said the events were well-known and “apparently resulted in many injuries.”

According to San Francisco police, at about 2:30 a.m. on Oct. 30, 2016, they were called to a hospital where a 16-year-old boy was reported in surgery following an aggravated assault. Sean Elder acknowledged his nephew was arrested following a “fight between two boys in a public place.”

In this photo release by Italian Carabinieri, Finnegan Lee Elder sits in his hotel room in Rome. Two American teenagers were jailed in Rome on Saturday as authorities carry out a murder investigation in the killing of Italian police officer Mario Cerciello Rega, 35. A detention order issued by prosecutors was shown on Italian state broadcaster RAI, naming the suspects as Gabriel Christian Natale Hjorth and Finnegan Lee Elder. (Italian Carabinieri via AP)

 

“The young men squared off with one another in a mutual challenge,” he said. “Unfortunately, the other boy tripped and fell backwards during the fight, injuring his head accidentally. The incident was tragic and unfortunate, but did not involve drugs, or weapons.”

Since he was a juvenile, no public information is available about Elder’s criminal case.

Elder’s family has said he was on his first solo trip to Europe and went to meet his friend in Rome because Natale-Hjorth had relatives there. The Italian Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that Natale-Hjorth, whose father is Italian, has Italian citizenship as well as American.

After Cerciello Rega’s died at a hospital, officers tracked the Americans to their hotel room and reported finding the alleged weapon, an 18-centimeter-long (7 inches) military-style attack knife, hidden in the room’s drop ceiling.

Elder told police he brought the knife with him from the United States a few days earlier, investigators said on Tuesday. But he and Natale-Hjorth gave investigators conflicting statements about the weapon, according to Judge Gallo.

Elder reported that Natale-Hjorth hid the knife in the hotel room, while Natale-Hjorth said he didn’t even know about a stabbing until his friend woke him hours later and told him he had “used a knife” and then washed it.

Prosecutor Nunzia D’Elia, who interrogated the pair Friday, said both exhibited apparent difficulty in grasping the gravity of the situation.

“One of them said, ‘Is he really dead? Dead, dead?” D’Elia told journalists, going on to identify the speaker as Natale-Hjorth.

But the two were “lucid and able to recount” their versions of events during hours of questioning, despite telling authorities they drank beer and shots of liquor that night, D’Elia said.

Prosecutors said the teens were informed of their rights, and defense lawyers and English-speaking interpreters were present during the recorded interrogations.

The young Americans’ treatment by authorities in Rome became an issue Sunday after Italian newspapers published a photograph of Natale-Hjorth sitting in a police department room with his eyes blindfolded and his hands cuffed behind his back.

In this photo obtained from Italian Carabinieri, Gabriel Christian Natale-Hjorth sits blindfolded in a police station in Rome on Friday July 26, 2019. Natale-Hjorth, a suspect in the slaying of police officer Deputy Brigadier Mario Cerciello Rega, was blindfolded before he was interrogated in Rome, an Italian police commander said Sunday July 28 after the emergence of a photo showing the young tourist restrained with handcuffs and with his head bowed. Natale-Hjorth and another suspect from California, 19-year-old Finnegan Lee Elder remain jailed, while the murdered police officer Mario Cerciello Rega is to be buried in southern Italy on Monday. (Italian Carabinieri via AP)

 

Prosecutor Michele Prestipino said the blindfolding – a violation of Italian law – was being investigated to determine which Carabinieri officer was responsible for it and how the photo was leaked to the newspapers.

Authorities allowed Natale-Hjorth to confer privately with a lawyer before prosecutors interrogated him, Prestipino added.

Elder was never blindfolded after he was taken into custody, Gargaro said.

In Italy, authorities are supposed to respect the dignity of criminal suspects. For example, when suspects are taken in handcuffs to a police station, it is standard practice to cover their bound wrists so they aren’t visible to news photographers.

Amanda Knox, an American who was convicted but ultimately acquitted of the 2007 slaying of her British housemate in Italy, tweeted that she was getting a lot of questions about the current.

“All I can say is: I’m withholding judgment,” said Knox, whose closely watched case received sensational and exhaustive news coverage. “It should be tried in the court of law, not the court of public opinion.”

___

AP reporters Janie Har and Samantha Maldonado in San Francisco and Nicole Winfield in Rome contributed to this report

https://www.apnews.com/effd972ee3334ea9a22da2fdb3bd7c7f

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Posted in: Arrests, Assault, Attacks on Police, Crime & Criminals, Deaths, Drugs/Drug Trafficking, Firearms, Homicide, International Policing, Line-of-Duty Deaths, Murder/Attempted Murder, Police, Police Officer Killed, Victims of Crime

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