Pelosi takes hard line against border wall funding – ‘There’s not going to be any wall money in the legislation’

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters during a news conference a day after a bipartisan group of House and Senate bargainers met to craft a border security compromise aimed at avoiding another government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

By ANDREW TAYLOR and ALAN FRAM,  Associated Press  WASHINGTON (AP) 01/31 — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi took a hard line Thursday against funding President Donald Trump’s long-stalled border wall, a move that could gridlock Capitol Hill negotiations that just got underway.

“There’s not going to be any wall money in the legislation,” Pelosi, D-Calif., told reporters. Her remarks came after Democrats had signaled at least some flexibility in the talks on border security funding that began only Wednesday.

Pelosi’s stance came as Trump used Twitter to reiterate his demands on the wall and appeared to sour on the congressional talks aimed at striking a deal with Democrats.

In a barrage of morning tweets, Trump sent mixed messages in which he alternately hardened his wall demand and also suggested that repairing existing fencing is a big part of his plan.

“Lets just call them WALLS from now on and stop playing political games! A WALL is a WALL!,” Trump tweeted.

Democrats in the House have offered a vague border security plan that would not provide a penny for his wall, ignoring his warnings that they’d be wasting their time if they don’t come up with wall money.

From left, Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., the assistant Democratic leader in the Senate, meet as a bipartisan group of House and Senate bargainers work to craft a border security compromise in hope of avoiding another government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. The biggest obstacle is President Donald Trump’s demand that Congress provide taxpayer money to build parts of his proposed wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

 

Trump on Thursday tamped down expectations, telling GOP negotiators that they were “wasting their time.”

“Democrats, despite all of the evidence, proof and Caravans coming, are not going to give money to build the DESPERATELY needed WALL. I’ve got you covered. Wall is already being built, I don’t expect much help!” Trump tweeted.

Trump is considering declaring a national emergency and shifting billions of dollars in previously allocated funds to build the wall, and Pelosi’s move could push the president further in that direction.

The high-stakes talks are taking place against the backdrop of another possible shutdown in mid-February — an outcome Trump’s GOP allies in the Senate are especially eager to avoid. It increases the chances that the only way to avert another shutdown would be to put a host of federal agencies on autopilot for weeks or months.

Trump and the White House have proven to be an unpredictable force in the shutdown debate, mixing softer rhetoric about a multi-faceted approach to border security with campaign-style bluster about the wall. Lawmakers negotiating the bill are well aware that he could quash an agreement at any time, plunging them back into crisis.

Pelosi’s declaration promises to put a nail in Trump’s request for $5.7 billion to build about 234 miles of barriers along the U.S. border with Mexico. Trump’s GOP allies acknowledge he might have settled for just a fraction of it. The Democratic plan includes new money for customs agents, scanners, aircraft and boats to police the border, and to provide humanitarian assistance for migrants.

The Democratic offer Wednesday was just a starting point in House-Senate talks on border security funding that kicked off in a basement room in the Capitol. Then, a top Democrat, House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., acknowledged that “everything is on the table,” including the border barriers demanded by Trump. Lawmakers on both sides in the talks signaled flexibility in hopes of resolving the standoff with Trump that sparked the 35-day partial government shutdown.

“Democrats are once again supporting strong border security as an essential component of homeland security. Border security, however, is more than physical barriers; and homeland security is more than border security,” said Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif.

Senators revisited a bipartisan $1.6 billion proposal for 65 miles of fencing in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas that passed a key committee last year. The panel of old-school lawmakers from the powerful appropriations committees has ample expertise on homeland security issues, as many of them helped finance fence built over the years that stretches across much of the 1,954-mile border.

From left, Rep. Chuck Fleischmann, R-Tenn., Rep. Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., rear, Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, and Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, greet each other as the bipartisan group of House and Senate bargainers finished their first meeting to craft a border security compromise in hope of avoiding another government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

 

“Because of the work we did years ago we’ve already built almost 700 miles of fencing on our nation’s border,” said Rep. David Price, D-N.C. “Whatever the president may say it is far from an open border. Meanwhile, the number of undocumented immigrants crossing our border or attempting to cross remain not at alarming highs but at historic lows.”

Republican allies of the president said there will have to be some money to meet Trump’s demands. But they also predict privately that the White House is eager to grab an agreement and declare victory — even if winning only a fraction of Trump’s request.

“The components of border security are people, technology and a barrier. And everybody has voted for all three,” said Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D. “To get to an agreement we’ve got to have all three in there.”

But as talks on the homeland security budget open, Trump and Republicans are in a weakened position just 17 days before the government runs out of money again without a deal. Democrats won back the House in a midterm rout and prevailed over Trump in the shutdown battle.

“Smart border security is not overly reliant on physical barriers,” said Lowey as the session began Wednesday. She said the Trump administration has failed to demonstrate that physical barriers are cost effective compared with better technology and more personnel.

The comments at once served notice that Democrats weren’t ruling out financing physical structures, but would do so only on a limited basis.

Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., who chairs the Senate Appropriations Committee, said that while Republicans favor improved border security technology, “Smart technology alone does not actually stop anyone from crossing into the U.S. illegally.”

Shelby said physical barriers are needed “not from coast to coast, but strategically placed where traffic is highest.” That echoed recent remarks by Trump as he’s retreated from his more strident comments from the 2016 presidential campaign.

The president surrendered last Friday and agreed to reopen government for three weeks so negotiators can seek a border security deal, but with no commitments for wall funds.

https://www.apnews.com/d2767ce335644e4c9d27386231b1edf3

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Posted in: Border Control, Border Patrol, Illegal Immigration, Legislation, National Security, Police Equipment/Technology, Politics, U.S. Government

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